First Keeogo Robotics Centre launched in Malaysia for stroke therapy

Keeogo

B-Temia Asia (BTA) has officially launched ASEAN’s first Keep-on-going “Keeogo” Robotic Training Center (RTC) in Malaysia. Under a joint venture agreement, B-Temia Asia, Wistron Medical Technology Corporation (WMT), and medical and healthcare supplier Rehabotics Medtech, aim to make rehabilitation technology more accessible to stroke and neurologically injured patients in the region.

The first Keeogo RTC is located in Midtown Petaling Jaya. Among the advanced robotic rehabilitation technology and devices available is the smart motorised orthosis device to regain lower limb strength and agility, and the wearable hand exoskeleton for upper limb motion training.

Malaysia currently averages almost 100 daily admissions for stroke alone across healthcare facilities nationwide: of these cases, 7 out of 10 stroke survivors are activities of daily living (ADL)-dependent. Rehabilitation technology is the much-needed solution to restore ability and confidence in stroke survivors as well as the growing geriatric population.

Effective rehabilitation – technology and physiotherapy, combined – also plays a role in enhancing one’s survival rate from numerous neurological and orthopaedic disorders.

“In the past, patients may have had to deal with less than-ideal lives — wheelchair-bound or bedridden due to the severity of their condition. This loss of mobility, if prolonged by insufficient care, can be devastating for patients and families alike,” said Donald Huang, BTA President, and the CTO at the Wistron Group.

“As a provider of improved outpatient rehabilitation producing solutions for physical therapy professionals and their patients in need, we aim to change this with our RTCs. The centres will be equipped with a variety of rehabilitative tech aimed at providing unmatched state-of-the-art patient care and safety, and are set to aid patients in recovering faster, maintaining hope, and keep them moving forward.”

A quick look at the robotics technology at the Keeogo RTC in PJ:

The smart motorised orthosis is the only commercially available Dermoskeleton which is lightweight and flexible, and provides safe and customised active training. The smart motorised orthosis helps patients with impaired lower limb mobility regain the ability to move and walk even after undergoing life-altering complications.

Meanwhile the “Mirror Hand,” the wearable hand exoskeleton by Rehabotics Medtech is designed to treat patients with neuromuscular disorders and diseases that could potentially lead to permanent loss of hand functions. The wearable hand exoskeleton guides the affected hand in practicing fundamental movements using mirror therapy. By combining passive continuous motion and bilateral training mechanisms, this will eventually train users to interact with real objects.

The introduction of the RTCs and increased accessibility to Keeogo technology are set to lay the foundation for more advancements in the rehabilitation market, positioning Malaysia as a regional leader in the physiotherapy field. Launched concurrently with Keeogo Japan and Keeogo Taiwan, the Keeogo RTC in Malaysia brings the latest in global rehabilitative technology and therapy to local communities in the ASEAN region.

Yee King Hwa, Managing Director of Keeogo Malaysia and of Rehabotics Medtech, added, “With the launch of this RTC and more to come we are going to make rehabilitation easy and accessible for patients across Malaysia, restoring the quality of daily life for all those in need. We look to start a wonderful new experience of robotic rehabilitation here, transforming lives and national healthcare for the better.”

The companies aim to establish similar centres and affiliated branches in more localities in Malaysia, via partnerships with qualified independent physical therapy professionals or rehabilitation clinics and hospitals.

Do visit https://keeogomalaysia.com to find out more.

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